Street Photography Tips

How to identify your photography vision ? The nature of street photography often means you shoot first and ask question later(if at all). You photograph the situation as it presents itself. If you have to stop and ask if you can take a photo you will probably loose the moment completely. If the subject knows they are being photographed they can become self-consious and the shot can look staged. Many of the best street photography is spontaneous. That isn’t to say you shouldn’t ask people to take their photo, especially if the composition warrants it.

I have never had an issue asking people if I can take their photo. I ask politely and tell them I’m a photographer, and they are usually happy to pose. I will also show them the pic I have just taken of them and give them my Instagram so they can check it out (or I will email it to them). Recently I asked a lady sitting on a park bench in Central Park if I could take her photo (she was wearing a nice yellow raincoat and hat and stood-out against the green background). She grilled me and then asked me for five bucks to take her photo. I declined, not because I’m cheap but because I’d rather the exchange be a mutual idea. Fair enough she tried it on – its NYC right? A hustle is a hustle.

I have never had an issue asking people if I can take their photo. I ask politely and tell them I’m a photographer, and they are usually happy to pose. I will also show them the pic I have just taken of them and give them my Instagram so they can check it out (or I will email it to them). Recently I asked a lady sitting on a park bench in Central Park if I could take her photo (she was wearing a nice yellow raincoat and hat and stood-out against the green background). She grilled me and then asked me for five bucks to take her photo. I declined, not because I’m cheap but because I’d rather the exchange be a mutual idea. Fair enough she tried it on – its NYC right? A hustle is a hustle.

Thanks to Andrew White
Source of infoandrew white

Color balancing your photo using AWB setting in your DSLR

Color balance techniques – You can pick between AWB, tungsten, fluorescent , or the K ( Kelvin method ) and it depends on the light source. Most light sources for interiors are either incandescent ( tungsten ) or flourescent.  For your picture style, use neutral or standard or for cool black & whites use monochrome. Don’t use the AWB settings of shady,cloudy, landscape, and portraits. These are totally useless settings and I don’t know why Nikon, Canon, etc. even include them in your camera settings. It just makes it more confusing for the first time digital camera owner.

 

Adjust white balance for more-accurate colors on a Canon 70D

You’ll find Canon’s automatic white balance adequate for most shooting situations, except incandescent and low-light situations. Picking a preset white balance, such as Daylight, Tungsten or Shade, may do the trick in those scenarios. Doing this merely requires tapping the White Balance box after pressing Q and scrolling with the Main Dial. But when that doesn’t give you the color environment you want, you’ll have to use custom white balance, which, on the 70D, is a tedious process.

Landscape Photography Tips

1.  Beautiful landscape photos are often defined by the quality of light they were taken in. As a consequence, photographers tend to shoot early in the morning or during late afternoons when the sun is lower, less contrasty and often displays a subtle colour palette of moody hues. For this reason, the hours after dawn and before dusk are known as the ‘magic hours’. If rising at dawn doesn’t sit well with your idea of a relaxing weekend, don’t panic – there are plenty of great landscape opportunities throughout the day.

 

sunsetshot santa monica

2. Composition is key to successful landscape photography, and if you don’t know where to start, use the ‘rule of thirds’ to get things going. Perhaps the king of all beginner landscape photography tips, it’s an easy principle to apply – simply divide your frame into imaginary thirds on both the horizontal and vertical axis. Now simply place areas of interest at the points at which the lines intersect or – in the case of a horizon – along one of the lines. However, don’t be afraid to throw away the rule book and totally disregard the conventions of composition. While youmight have some awful failures, you might also create an original and striking masterpiece. Be bold and experiment.

SunsetCliffs600x450px

 

3. Use a neutral density filter

One of the great problems for landscape photographers is the difference in brightness between the sky and the land. While the human eye is capable of perceiving detail across this tonal range, a digital sensor isn’t capable of recording it. So ND Grad filters (neutral density graduated filters) were created  and have been avidly used by landscape shooters ever since. Their gradual transition from clear to dark neutral density allows the photographer to balance the exposure between the sky and the land to make a more even exposure in which detail remains in both the highlight and shadow areas. An alternative to this is exposure blending, where different exposures are made of the scene and combined in software later

 

Creative Composition Technique – Camera Angles

A Different Camera Angle Can Tell a Completely Different Story

Camera Angle – For anyone starting out in photography as a complete newcomer, the common thing to do is to stay at “normal height” and photograph the subject as you see it.This is all good and well but you will undoubtedly place yourself firmly amongst the masses of the ordinary photographer.

One way to make your images stand out from others is to see it from another angle or viewpoint. When thinking about the subject in front of you and how you will capture it, move around a bit, up and down. Find an angle that no-one else sees or has thought of and start to create you own style.

Once you try this, all sorts of ideas start to flow and it brings a whole new side to your photography. You find yourself doing it more and more in other situations such as weddings or parties. The angle that you choose, can tell a completely different story to the others.

I shot my friend’s horse in Poway, California with a wide angle ( 18mm on the Canon 20D ) and with a low angle. The effect would be different if I shot straight or above but since the horse was taller than I am, I was stuck with the low angle but the shot came out well.

Along with camera angles, think of what’s also in the frame:

What is the foreground interest?
What do you want to appear in the background?
What story can I tell with this image?
What does it say to someone who wasn’t there?
So basically if you are able to; lie down, climb up, get inside, go underneath, get on top, run alongside, dive in, look through, get behind and shove your camera anywhere (within reason) to get that shot that is just a little different.

If you are looking to sell images as stock, these are all vital points to consider, if they are just for you and your images will be displayed somewhere, it is great if they still provoke these kinds of questions, just like any art.